Santorum Agrees: Obama is “An Avowed Muslim” with “No Legal Right to be President”

This week’s multi-Smackdown goes to:

1. The bigoted woman in this video who said about President Obama:

He is an avowed Muslim, and why isn’t something being done to get him out of our government? He has no legal right to be calling himself President!

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2. The bigoted audience who applauded her.

3. Rick Santorum for his agreeable response to this bigoted woman:

Yeah, I’m doing my best to try to get him out of our government.

rick-santorum

And an additional Smackdown to Santorum for his pitiful, defensive excuse for agreeing with the bigoted woman: “She was an elderly lady.

PUL-leez!

Here’s how John McCain responded to another bigoted “elderly lady” who made the same sort of Islamaphobic comment about then-Presidential candidate Obama:

Bigoted woman: I don’t believe in…I can’t trust Obama. He’s an Arab.

John McCain: “No. No, m’am. He’s a decent family man, a citizen, who I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues. And that’s what this campaign is about. Thank you.

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That audience applauded this non-bigoted response.

And here’s a political figure who provides an answer which gets right to the heart of such sanctioned displays of racism and Islamaphobia:

colin-powell

Colin Powell 

The correct answer is, [Obama] is not a Muslim. He’s a Christian. He’s always been a Christian. But the really right answer is, what if he is a Muslim? Is there something wrong with being a Muslim in this country? This is America…this is not the way we should be [behaving] in this country.

Shame on Rick Santorum & each and every supporter who applauded the bigoted, Islamaphobic comments at that gathering.

God help minorities and Muslim Americans if Santorum becomes leader of this country.

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What’s your view about this issue?

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Sylver’s Saturday Smackdown

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14 thoughts on “Santorum Agrees: Obama is “An Avowed Muslim” with “No Legal Right to be President”

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  3. Who cares if he s a Muslim or not? Well, I know he s a Christian, but if I were American, I would only care about if he s doing a good job as the president or not. Shame on all who only think about someones religion or ethic background.

    • Exactly! Unfortunately, having our very first Black person with such supreme power is unnerving & intolerable to many in a country whose origins are based on the genocide and subjugation of dark-skinned races. 😦

  4. Yes. Obama is a Muslim. That’s why he’s attacked more Muslim countries than Bush and has done more than any other president to bring harm to the Arab World and attended a church run by a racist black preacher.

    This is all sarcasm of course. Anyone who still thinks that Obama is a Muslim is a whack job. The real reason they bring it up is because Islamophobia is more tolerable than saying they don’t like him because he’s black.

    • You’ve got it. Islamaphobia is our nation’s acceptable bigotry du jour. Racism against African-Americans obviously still proliferates (except in the minds of those who think our Black president = proof that racism is dead 🙄 ). But blatant racism against African-Americans now gets many more public slap-downs than Islamaphobia – which one can acceptably indulge in freely & with abundant support in our democracy.

      That said, there are still avalanches of African-American racist slurs and images that have been and are still being hurled at our Black president, right along side the Islamaphobic slurs & images. The bigots in this post, nee the entire bigoted community, must be tickled pink to be able to smear the most powerful minority in the country with both racism & xenophobia.

      • “The bigots in this post, nee the entire bigoted community, must be tickled pink to be able to smear the most powerful minority in the country with both racism & xenophobia.”

        Smackdowns aren’t the answer Sylver. They promote the hate and spread the fear. This little old lady was afraid. Santorum was weak. I wonder if most of the people in the crowd even knew what they were applauding. If it’s like any political rally I’ve attended, they were just applauding the idea that Obama should be defeated, because you only hear a portion of what’s said by anyone.

        Right now my Christian family in Egypt is getting smacked down. My grand-nephews are getting beat up. My nephew’s place of business was held up by machine-gun-toting Muslims. One of my cousins was murdered. But none of that was done by the nice guy who lives next door to me. He designs carpets and fonts for the Koran.

        What we don’t need is more smackdowns. WHY is that lady so afraid? That would make for a good blog. Labels don’t help – no matter what they are. Blogs such as this one promote division, not diversity. How can I honestly discuss my concerns about Obama’s politics if I have to be afraid that I’m going to be labeled as a xenophobic racist just for having the questions?

        I happen to “like” Obama more than I do Romney, but I don’t “like” Obama’s politics. I think government should be pared down and more of it should be handled at the state and local level, rather than by the federal government. That doesn’t have a thing to do with religion, but since I’m a Southern Bible-toting WASP there’s plenty who would deny me that distinction. Maybe not you, but it wouldn’t be hard to round up a bunch of liberals who would be glad to throw me under the bus. I can introduce you to a few.

        The problem with racists is that they lump everyone together and make judgments based on bias. Seems to me they have a lot in common with the people who are pointing fingers at them.

        • Hi, Jane. Thank you for this in-depth comment.

          First, let me say that I’m very sorry to hear about the harassment of your Christian family in Egypt, your nephew’s trouble with “gun-toting Muslims,” the murder of your cousin, and the other things your family is experiencing. I really hope these troubles do not last for your family. And I’m glad to hear that the carpet and Koran designer right next door is not involved…

          I do understand, as you said in a prior comment on racism, that you think we should not talk about these things, and that we should all just “get over it.”
          https://sylverblaque.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/minority-defense-pretense-no-apology-hypocrisy/
          In light of those comments, I understand your comments here. But, again, we disagree about this.

          My feeling is, as I said in that prior post on racism, that allowing these very public and therefore influential demonstrations of racism/xenophobia to slip beneath a carpet of silence helps no one but the perpetrators. In fact, I believe, it allows bigotry to continue unchecked.

          I don’t believe, as you do, that saying “Shame on you!” to bigots promotes hate or spreads fear. Racism & xenophobia promotes hate and spreads fear.

          As you pointed out, “labels don’t help – no matter what they are.” I agree. However, one who disparages another because of their race, nationality, or religion is a bigot. That is the definition of bigot.

          Blogs such as this one promote division, not diversity.”

          I’m sorry you feel this way, Jane. I believe my blog – which is based on diversity – promotes the exact opposite of division. Again, your belief in not discussing bigotry is completely opposite to my belief in bringing such things to the attention of as many people as possible. I feel as strongly about this as you do about your viewpoint. I guess we’ll have to, once again, agree to disagree on this.

          How can I honestly discuss my concerns about Obama’s politics if I have to be afraid that I’m going to be labeled as a xenophobic racist just for having the questions?

          This is a valid & good question that I’m sure many of our fellow Americans have. I’ve wondered it myself at times. 😉 However, I don’t see that this has anything to do with my reason for this post. The woman in this post was not questioning Obama’s politics. She was questioning his religion & his right to be president. She, in fact, stated definitively (and erroneously) that Obama “is an avowed Muslim” with “no legal right to be calling himself President.” The only question she raised was why Obama hasn’t been kicked out of “OUR” government – as if no Muslim American should have the right to be president in America. There is no ambiguity here about this woman’s bigotry against “avowed Muslims” who should “have no right” to call themselves president in “OUR” government.” This is a far cry from questioning Obama’s politics.

          This little old lady was afraid. Santorum was weak. I wonder if most of the people in the crowd even knew what they were applauding.

          Honestly, these sound like a lot of excuses for allowing such bigotry to go unchecked. Let’s just shrug this one off, let it pass, no need to make a big deal about it. I’m sorry, but I cannot agree with that. My belief is that this public a display of bigotry is a sign of just how acceptable intolerance has become because of allowing it to remain hidden, unquestioned, or unchallenged.

          WHY is that lady so afraid? That would make for a good blog.”

          Agreed! And thank you! 🙂 That is exactly what my blog explores every day, in every section, in various forms – WHY people feel the way they do, think the way they, do, live, dress, speak, behave, etc. the way they do. Because I believe talking about diversity is key in the fight against bigotry in all its forms. And I don’t believe in ignoring bigotry on public display.

          The problem with racists is that they lump everyone together and make judgments based on bias. Seems to me they have a lot in common with the people who are pointing fingers at them.

          Really? People who challenge racists are just as bad as the racists themselves? I couldn’t disagree more. (No surprise here, huh? :wink:) Had I said in this post that every “little old lady” in the country is a racist/xenophobe, you may have a vague point in your statement. But I am pointing out a specific instance involving a specific bigot who made a specific bigoted comment. I’m afraid I don’t see the commonality between bigots and those who challenge them.

          But you are right in one respect, Jane: I am biased – against racism. Against xenophobia. Against bigotry, period. And especially against not speaking out about it.

          • I think we’re just so far on opposite sides that we’re having two different conversations. Gang mentality causes racism and xenophobia, but gang mentality breeds witch hunts of all stripes. What’s the difference in “nigger” and “racist” if they are both used to bully and marginalize people? Not by you personally, but you embolden others less noble. You think I’m blind to continuing racial prejudice, but I’m willing to consider what you say. I’m just opposed to the smack down mentality.

            So, we can agree to disagree. I heard what you said the last time this came up and I’m willing to think that there may be some truth to it. Perhaps there is more racism out there in the world at large than there is in my world, where this WASP lives with her Coptic husband between a Muslim carpet designer and an aging hippie. That’s why I’m still here. But really, smack downs? Do you really think that’s the best way to change people? To me you are much more convincing when you’re a little less judgmental.

            • Well, I’m glad we can once again agree to disagree. 🙂

              “…you embolden others less noble.”

              I don’t believe confronting and calling attention to bigotry emboldens the less noble. I believe it highlights abuse, and thereby sets the cogs in motion for change.

              “But really, smack downs? Do you really think that’s the best way to change people? To me you are much more convincing when you’re a little less judgmental.”

              I don’t believe confronting bigotry is being judgmental. Bigotry is abuse. I always have, and will continue to confront and call attention to abuse inflicted on victims of bigotry. Because it is WRONG. It is a crime against individuals and against humanity, and I will never stand silently by as long as I have a conscience and a voice. And I will confront it, and work to change it in as many different ways as I can, utilizing as many different methods as I can.

              That said, believe it or not :wink:, I do understand what you’re saying regarding smack downs. However, this is one of the many ways in which I choose to highlight such issues. You feel I am more convincing in other sections of my blog, where I utilize other methods. There are others who respond more readily to smack downs. Everyone is different and has different preferences for absorption. I choose to utilize different methods for different people because I recognize that not everyone is the same, nor has the same road leading into their psyche. On my blog, people can choose which sections/days they prefer, and ignore the ones they don’t. This is one of the reasons I created so many different sections on my my blog – I like to try to reach different people in their preferred ‘language.’

              “You think I’m blind to continuing racial prejudice, but I’m willing to consider what you say.” and “…we can agree to disagree. I heard what you said the last time this came up and I’m willing to think that there may be some truth to it. Perhaps there is more racism out there in the world at large than there is in my world…”

              Jane, this is one of the reasons I value your comments. Because, though you & I do not see eye-to-eye on this issue, you don’t let that stop you from expressing your views, nor do you bury your head in the sand against another viewpoint. I respect you greatly for that. More importantly, I really feel that opposing viewpoints are the mana of learning, and every time you comment on this issue I learn something. And, from my heart, I thank you for these lessons. 🙂

              • I’ve become very fond of you and our discussions. I can’t believe we’re just fellow bloggers. I feel like I know your mind better than people I’ve been acquainted with all my life and I think you “get” me, too. Even if we can’t always “get” one another’s opinions.

                I just wish for a “kinder, gentler” world where there’s not even anything to smack down, but you have to remember, I’m a girl of the South, where we “nice” people to death. I understand that you see a lot of prejudice, racism, bigotry and xenophobia that I don’t, but whether that’s because I’m blind or it’s just not in my immediate proximity, I don’t know. I do see it in the world, because of what is happening in places like Egypt, but I don’t see it in my immediate sphere of friends, family and acquaintances.

                What I do see around me is truly kind, gentle, thoughtful people, that I care about, cut to the core by a name or a label they don’t deserve. I see people, like me, growing tired of explaining why being conservative does not automatically translate into being mean and uncaring. I’ve also met people who were once like me, but they’ve been cussed out so many times and been called so many names that their hearts have become hardened.

                What I see seems to bear a lot of resemblance to the marginalization you are fighting. The frustrated people cannot be gathered under any specific race, religion or sexual preference, beyond the political tag of conservatism – but unfortunately, that seems to be enough.

                • Thank you, Jane. I, too, value our discussions. 🙂 And my fondness for you grows as well, each time we butt heads & struggle to comprehend a viewpoint diametrically opposed to our own. As well, my respect for you grows following each of our collisions as I see that you’re still here, willing to entertain a viewpoint that seems incomprehensible to your sensibilities. Oh, to be able to package and vaccinate every closed mind with your willingness to see & understand a side that, previously, you were against or unaware of. Mega props to you for your willingness to engage, debate, consider, and even occasionally understand & accept alternate viewpoints. I think, if we met & became friends, we’d have the most volatile (so, no molotov cocktail shooters! 😯 ) and enlightening friendship ever! 🙂

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